Bedbugs, food poisoning and injuries at hotels

18th Oct 2019
Lisa Boyle

Bedbugs, food poisoning and injuries at hotels
Hotel guests are always supposed to feel comfortable, pampered and most importantly, safe from accidents and injury. 
 
However, unfortunately for some, their experience falls short of the high standards advertised and some guests can end up injured ill, or end up having their safety put at risk.
 
If you are injured or fall ill during your stay in any particular hotel or apartment, you may be entitled to file a hotel accident claim for compensation.
 
This includes slips and falls caused by negligence, food poisoning  burns, bed bugs and unattended swimming pools. 
 
Our Associate Director John Dillon offers this advice for how to ensure you can successfully make a claim.
“Whilst staying in a hotel is generally a pleasant care free experience, occasionally things do go wrong and accidents happen,” he says.
 
“If the accident is due to fault on the hotel’s part then it is important that you remember steps to ensure you can make a successful claim at a later date. Normally in the aftermath of suffering an accident/injury your thoughts and attention will be on other matters and not focused on the key details that you require to pursue a successful claim.
 
“The first important step to take is reporting the accident and having it noted in the hotels accident book. This will ensure a date/time record is maintained for when you suffered the accident. It will also note down details of whom you reported the accident to and the circumstances of the incident. A key aspect it to check the accident book entry for accuracy before signing and dating it.”
 
For the best results possible, guests should always ensure they have photographic evidence of the defect that has caused you to suffer the injury.
 
This will document the state of the premises at the time you have suffered your accident and ensures that the evidence is captured before any repairs are made by the hotel staff.
Pen & Paper
 
It is also important to establish whether or not the defect or problem has previously been reported to the hotel. If it has then it will help if you can obtain details of when any complaints were raised, by whom and to whom.  
 
You should make a note of any witnesses who (1) have seen your accident or (2) made complaints to the hotel about the defect or problem before your accident occurred.
 
John continued: “It is important to note that a hotel owes its guests a reasonable duty of care therefore if a defect/problem has existed before your accident, the hotel were aware of that problem, took no steps to rectify the issue and you subsequently suffer an injury as a result of the hotel’s failure to address it then you have the makings of a successful claim.
 
“The key to ensuring success is gathering and noting all the relevant evidence to help support your claim against the hotel at an early stage.”